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Sleep

  • Getting the right amount and quality of sleep improves your health and well-being. This is particularly relevant for individuals who have IBD
  • The need for sleep varies. While some people need about 10 hours of sleep to feel OK, others need only 5 hours of sleep. Most people need between 6 and a half and 8 and a half hours of sleep a night
  • People with IBD often have sleep difficulties as sleep could be interrupted by pain, discomfort or frequent trips to the bathroom
  • There are several ways in which we can relax (e.g. deep breathing, progressive muscle relaxation)

Tips for improving sleep

  • Have a regular routine (also called sleep hygiene) before bed, irrespective of sleeping during the day or night. For example, having a shower or bath, spending 30 minutes relaxing (e.g., meditation, light exercise, reading a book), clean teeth, etc then go to bed at a set time. By keeping a regular routine, the body learns when it is expected to sleep (or when it is wanted)
  • The best sleeping environment is one that is cool constant temperature, good airflow, dark and quiet. If there is outside noise, a constant background noise may help you sleep (e.g., relaxation tapes, radio)
  • Coffee or tea consumption should stop at least 2 to 4 hours before you to go to sleep. Coffee and tea can also exacerbate gut related symptoms
  • Avoid smoking before going to bed, its chemicals can provide a stimulatory effect therefore decreasing the ability to sleep. Smoking can also exacerbate gut related symptoms

START THE IBDCLINIC PSYCHOLOGICAL ASSESSMENT AND TREATMENT PROGRAM THAT INCLUDES A SECTION ON IMPROVING SLEEP




MORE LINKS

If you are interested in other gastrointestinal-focused information and intervention websites developed and hosted at
Swinburne University of Technology,
please go to:

IBSclinic.org.au for individuals with Irritable Bowel Syndrome

Gastroparesisclinic.org for individuals with Gastroparesis

DISCLAIMER

This website and its content is not intended or recommended as a substitute for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. Always seek advice of your own physician or other qualified health care professional regarding any medical questions or conditions.

© 2014 Swinburne University of Technology | CRICOS number 00111D